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Potential Indications

(under evaluation, nonclinical phase)

Lichen Planopilaris (LPP)

LPP is a chronic inflammatory disease that leads to permanent hair loss. LPP is the prototypical lymphocytic cicatricial alopecia (Lepe and Salazar, 2017), characterized by a chronic lymphocytic inflammation that leads to destruction of hair follicles, perifollicular fibrosis and sebaceous gland atrophy, leading to scarring alopecia.
LPP is a rare condition classified as orphan disease (ORPHA:525).
There are no products authorised for LPP treatment and no available therapeutic options that cure the disease exist.
Even if the pathogenesis of LPP is not yet completely understood, recent evidences (Harries et al, 2013 and 2018) show that LPP is characterized by immune privilege collapse on the hair follicle’s epithelial stem cell niche, immune cell attack, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT).

Localized Scleroderma (LS)

Localized scleroderma (LS) comprises a spectrum of sclerotic diseases that primarily affect the skin.
LS is a rare condition classified as orphan disease (ORPHA: 90289).
Morphea, the most frequent subtype of LS, usually appears in adults 40-50 years of age, and is also present in childhood 2-14 years of age. Depending on the subtype, LS can involve tissues adjacent to skin, i.e. fat, fascia, muscle and bone, and may lead to muscle atrophy. LS can result in facial/limb asimmetry, flexion contractures, disability.

No causal treatment for LS exists, and management is symptomatic. Treatment options include topical, systemic and ultraviolet therapy, depending on extent and severity. Corticoids for morphea lesions and immunosupressants for linear scleroderma are employed.

Acne Pathogenesis

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Psoriasis Pathogenesis

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References

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